Session Details

Session 1 — Getting to a Shared Understanding of Equity
Tuesday, December 10 (1:30pm - 2:45pm)

Session Hosts:

  • Lisa McNeilly – Director of Sustainability, City of Baltimore

  • Dorothy Morrison – Director, Office of Environment, Maryland Department of Transportation Headquarters

Equity, as opposed to equality, focuses on the needs of diverse and vulnerable populations and ways to meaningfully engage all by expanding access to information and resources. Let’s have a collective discussion on the definitions, practice, and implementation of equity in the private and public sectors.

Key Questions:

  • What are some strong practices in incorporating equity into organizations and sectors?

  • How can we advance equity awareness and initiatives that our organizations or sectors can follow?


Session 2 — Transforming Social & Environmental Challenges into Market Opportunities
Tuesday, December 10 (3:00pm - 4:15pm)

Session Hosts:

  • Trisha Bauman – CEO & Founder, TJBauman

  • Chris Castro – Director of Sustainability & Resilience, City of Orlando

This session investigates the types of businesses, for-profit initiatives, and cross-sector partnerships that are leading positive change to meet the growing social equity challenges generated by climate change. A multisector perspective — drawn from research into leading sustainable businesses (corporate to SMEs to startups) and their interfacing NGO/public partners — will bring insight into the ways in which pro-social business initiatives are currently meeting social-equity needs through scalable or replicable for-profit services and products.

Key Questions:

  • What works well and what doesn't?

  • What are the key considerations for initiating and developing effective, pro-social business initiatives and cross-sector partnerships.


Session 3 — Integrating Public Health into Planning
Tuesday, December 10 (4:30pm - 5:45pm)

Session Hosts:

  • Chris Castro – Director of Sustainability & Resilience, City of Orlando

  • Margaret Eaglin – Senior Epidemiologist, City of Chicago

Urban design can have enormous impacts on the physical and mental health, as well as the social and cultural vitality of populations. With almost 80% of the US population (and nearly 2/3 of the world’s population) living in urban areas, planners and public health professionals are presented with real challenges to creating equitable, healthy, and sustainable communities.

Key Questions:

  • What are some examples of collaborative partnerships between local public health and planning agencies in developing a comprehensive sustainability plan to build healthier communities?

  • How can we raise awareness about the shared common mission and perspectives of public health, planning, climate change and sustainability professionals to improve the health and well-being of human populations?


Session 4 — Enabling the Next Generation of Climate Change & Sustainability Professionals
Wednesday, December 11 (8:45am - 10:15am)

Session Hosts:

  • Denise DeLuca – Director, Sustainable Design Program, Minneapolis College of Art and Design

Today’s students and pre-professionals are tomorrow’s climate change and sustainability leaders, the inheritors of our legacy. It is critical that we bridge the gap between what students learn and how they'll earn -- a job, respect and a salary.

Key Questions:

  • What can we do as a profession to ease their way and ensure that students develop the vital skills, judgment and experience they’ll need to navigate to a successful future?

  • What do today’s students think about the future of climate change and sustainability action?


Session 5 — Professionalizing Our Practices in an Inclusive Manner
Wednesday, December 11 (10:45am - 12:15pm)

Session Hosts:

  • Fabian Sack – Director, Sustainably (Board President, ISSP)

The stakes are high and getting higher: climate change and sustainability professionals will soon be recognized as among the most important decision-makers in any organization, in every sector. While many in our profession see the value of requiring a credential or license to practice, others see such requirements as a potential barrier. Climate change and sustainable development are clearly “all hands on deck” challenges.

Key Questions:

  • How do we distinguish between professional responsibilities and community action?

  • What are some creative approaches to increasing the expectations and accountability of our professions while ensuring access to all?